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2009 Publications

Journal Publications

Carrol, M., Van der Merwe, A. and Lubbe S. 2009.  An Information Systems Auditor’s Profile Alternation 16,1 (2009), p. 318– 355, ISSN 1023-1757. 

The increasing dependence upon Information systems in the last few decades by businesses has resulted in concerns regarding auditing. IS auditing has changed from auditing “around the computer” to auditing through and with the computer. However, technology is changing and so is the profession of IS auditing. As IS auditing is dependent on Information Technology (IT), it is essential that an IS auditor possesses IT and auditing knowledge to bridge the gap between the IT and auditing professions. The aim of the study is therefore to define the roles and responsibilities expected from IS auditors, based on the different types of audit assignments and the steps involved in performing an IS audit assignment. It will also describes the basic IT and audit knowledge required from IS auditors based on the roles and responsibilities identified, discusses the soft skills required from IS auditors to successfully perform an IS audit assignment and define the main types of IS audit tools and techniques used most often to assist IS auditors in executing IS audit roles and responsibilities. The study finally presented a suggested IS auditor’s profile. A draft version of the paper is available here.

 

Kotzé, P.,  Van der Merwe, A. 2009. The Research Foci of Computing Research in South Africa as Reflected by Publications in the South African Computer Journal. South African Computer Journal, Vol 44, December 2009, p. 67 -84.

The South African Computer Journal, better known as SACJ, has, for the last nineteen years, been one of the most pertinent publications for the computing discipline within the South African milieu. In this paper we reflect on the topics of research articles published in SACJ over its first 40 volumes of the journal using the ACM Computing Classification Scheme as basis. In our analysis we divided the publications into three cycles of more or less six years in order to identify significant trends over the history of the journal. We also used the same classification scheme to analyse the publication trends of various South African tertiary education and research institutions.

 

Conference Publications

 

Greeff, Marde; Kotzé, Paula. 2009. A Lightweight Methodology to Improve Web Accessibility. In: Proceedings of the Annual Research Conference of the South African Institute of Computer  Scientists and Information Technologists,  edited by Jason Cohen and Scott Hazelhurst. SAICSIT in Association with the ACM, p. 30 - 39 .  ISBN 978-1-60558-643-4.

This paper introduces a methodology to improve the accessibility of websites with the use of free so-called automatic tools. The methodology has three iterative phases, namely assessing a website against accessibility guidelines, user testing and creating in-house ‘guidelines’ to prevent similar mistakes in future versions of the system. Aspects of accessibility addressed include the use of colour, accessibility guidelines and priorities, readability or comprehensibility, and screen reader simulators. We recommend free tools for each of these accessibility aspects and discuss the process that should be followed when evaluating a website. Another version of the paper is available here.

The paper received an Honoury Mention.

 

 

Smuts, Hanlie; Van der Merwe, Alta; Loock, Marianne;  Kotzé, Paula. 2009. A Framework and Methodology for Knowledge Management System Implementation. In: Proceedings of the Annual Research Conference of the South African Institute of Computer  Scientists and Information Technologists,  edited by Jason Cohen and Scott Hazelhurst. SAICSIT in Association with the ACM, p. 70 - 79 .  ISBN 978-1-60558-643-4.

Knowledge assets are of far greater value than any tangible asset and provide organisations with the basis for creating a sustainable competitive advantage. The nature of knowledge and knowledge management have given rise to a range of different definitions of knowledge management systems that enable organisations to convert their knowledge into actionable information that provides them with a competitive edge and innovative capability. Such an implementation process is a comprehensive course of action that requires focus and commitment through-out the organisation in order to achieve results, yet no universally accepted framework or methodology for such a process exists. This paper analyses and describes enhancements to a 12-step process derived by Calabrese and Orlando to implement a knowledge management system aimed at providing a more comprehensive framework and methodology for knowledge management system implementation. These enhancements are based on findings relating to a knowledge management proof of concept implementation conducted at one of the major mobile telecommunication operators in South Africa. Another version of the paper is available here.

 

Adebesin, Funmi, De Villiers, Ruth; Ssemugabi, Samual. 2009. Usability Testing of e-Learning: an Approach Incorporating Co-discovery and Think-aloud.  In: Proceedings of the 2009 Annual Conference of the Southern African Computer Lecturers Association (SACLA 2009). ACM Press, p. 6 - 15, ISBN, 978-1-60558-683-0.

 Computer applications developed to support learning in the cognitive domains are quite different from commercial transaction processing applications. The unique nature of such applications calls for different methods for evaluating their u ability. This paper presents the application and refinement of the framework for usability testing of interactive e-learning applications proposed by Masemola & de Villiers. In a pioneering usability testing study, we investigate the effectiveness of the think-aloud method when combined with co-discovery testing. Another version of the paper is available here.

 

Gelderblom, Helene; Kotzé Paula. Ten Design Lessons from the Literature on Child Development and Children’s Use of Technology, Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, Como, Italy, ACM Press, p. 52-60. ISBN: I978-1-60558-395-2.

The existing knowledge base on child development offers a wealth of information that can be useful for the design of children’s technology. Furthermore, academic journals and conference proceedings provide us with a constant stream of new research papers on child-computer interaction and interaction design for children. It will require some effort from designers to gather and digest the scattered research results and theoretical knowledge applicable to their products. We conducted an extended research project whereby the existing knowledge relating to the design of technology for children aged five to eight have been gathered and presented in a way that makes it accessible and useful to designers in practice. This paper provides and extract from that research, focusing on ten useful lessons learnt from existing literature. Another version of the paper is available here

 

Jacobs, Dina; Kotze, Paula; Van der Merwe, Alta;  2009. Towards an Enterprise Repository Framework, Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Advanced Enterprise Repositories (AER 2009), edited by Oliver Camp and Slimane Hammoudi, INSTICC Press, ISBN: 978-989-8111-93-7, p. 77 - 89. 

The enterprise architect is dependent on the functionality of the enterprise repository to define and maintain the enterprise architecture. Two of the specific functionalities are typical ‘warehouse’ related functionalities. The one requirement is to integrate multiple business process reference models as source models, similar to the reuse of data from different sources in a data warehouse environment. The second requirement is the flexible visualization of business process models that has a ‘slice-and-dice’ flavour as used in the data warehouse domain. By means of analogical reasoning, our research investigates using the theoretical foundation of the data warehouse domain to contribute to the definition of an enterprise repository framework. Based on the similarities found, an enterprise repository framework is derived. Another version of the paper is available here.

 

Gerber, AJ; Van der Merwe, AJ; (2009), Towards the use of formal ontologies in enterprise architecture framework repositories, The 1st International Workshop on Advanced Enterprise Repositories (AER 2009), Milan, Italy.

An enterprise architecture (EA) framework is a conceptual tool that assists organizations and businesses with the understanding of their own structure and the way they work. Normally an enterprise architecture framework takes the form of a comprehensive set of cohesive models or enterprise architectures that describe the structure and the functions of an enterprise. Generically, an architecture model is the description of the set of components and the relationships between them. The central idea of all architectures is to represent, or model (in the abstract) an orderly arrangement of the components that make up the system under question and the relationships between these components. It is clear within this context that the models within an enterprise architecture framework are complex. However, recent advances in ontologies and ontology technologies may provide the means to assist architects with the management of this complexity. In this position paper we want to argue for the integration of formal ontologies and ontology technologies as tools into enterprise architecture frameworks. Ontologies allow for the construction of complex conceptual models, but more signicant, ontologies can assist an architect by depicting all the consequences of her model, allowing for more precise and complete artifacts within enterprise architecture framework repositories, and because these models use standardized languages, they will promote integration and interoperability with and within these repositories. A draft version of the paper is available here.

 

Smuts, Hanlie; Van der Merwe, AJ; Loock, M (2009), Key characteristics in selecting software tools for knowledge management,  Key characteristics in selecting software tools for Knowledge Management,  11th International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems, Milan Italy (May 2009).

The shift to knowledge as the primary source of value results in the new economy being led by those who manage knowledge effectively. Today’s organisations are creating and leveraging knowledge, data and information at an unprecedented pace – a phenomenon that makes the use of technology not an option, but a necessity. Software tools in knowledge management are a collection of technologies and are not necessarily acquired as a single software solution. Furthermore, these knowledge management software tools have the advantage of using the organisation’s existing information technology infrastructure. Organisations and business decision makers spend a great deal of resources and make significant investments in the latest technology, systems and infrastructure to support knowledge management. It is imperative that these investments are validated properly, made wisely and that the most appropriate technologies and software tools are selected or combined to facilitate knowledge management. In this paper, we propose a set of characteristics that should support decision makers in the selection of software tools for knowledge management. These characteristics were derived from both in-depth interviews and existing theory in publications. A draft version of teh paper is available here.

 

Mbaya, I; Gerber, AJ; Van der Merwe, AJ; (2009), Requirements of a Security Framework for the Semantic Web, Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Software Engineering, IASTED 2009, Innsbruck, February 2009

 

Van der Merwe, A. & Kotzé, P. 2009. A Systematic Approach for the Identification of Process Reference Models. Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Software Engineering (SE 2009),  ACTA Press, ISBN: 978-0-88986-786-4, p. 75 – 80.

Process models are used in different application domains to capture knowledge on the process flow. Process reference models (PRM) are used to capture reusable process models, which should simplify the identification process of process models and make it economically viable. In the identification of core elements within the process reference model, the focus is often on the end-product and not on the procedure used to identify the elements. As often proved in development of projects, there is a danger to emphasize the end-product without following a solid identification procedure. In this paper, the focus is on the identification of process reference models, where the authors suggest a method to follow for identification of process reference models, apply the method to a case study and reflect on the experiences during requirements elicitation for identification of process reference models at different institutions.  Another version of the paper is availble here.

 

Kotzé  P;  Wong W;  Jorge J, Dix, A;  and Silva P A . 2009. Creativity and HCI: From Experience to Design in Education. In: Kotzé  P;  Wong W;  Jorge J, Dix, A;  and Silva P A (Eds), Creativity and HCI: From Experience to Design in Education. Springer, 1 – 11, ISBN: 978-0-387-89021-0.

There was a time when we knew what to teach in our HCI courses … For the early stages, we had user-centred design, perhaps ethnography or participatory design. As we looked in more detail there were interface guidelines and platform toolkits. Then, to evaluate we had heuristics (only five users needed, good for student groups), cognitive walkthroughs and formal experiments. Above all, we all knew our ISO mantra efficiency and effectiveness… and what was that third one? Of course some students still found it hard to ‘think user’, and it was such a pain trying to mark all that project-based coursework … But we knew what we were doing, and we knew what we were designing for … Computer systems stayed safely behind glass screens and about their only physical influence was when they spat out a floppy disk …

But for several years now feral computers have escaped office desks, and found their way into bedrooms and television sets, mobile phones and smart cards … They even talk to us in our cars and turn on the tap in the bathroom. Users have now even discovered that third part of the ISO mantra, but having done so are never satisfied and expect to enjoy using these things and even have fun! Even the safe world behind the glass screen has gone wild, with Web2.0, and community content … Would the person who user-tested that JavaScript rollover, please stand up? Another version of the paper is available here.

 

Wong W, Kotzé P, Read J, Bannon L; Hvannberg E. 2009. From Inventivity in Limerick to Creativity in Aveiro: Lessons Learnt. In: Kotzé  P;  Wong W;  Jorge J, Dix, A;  and Silva P A (Eds), Creativity and HCI: From Experience to Design in Education. Springer, 12 – 22, ISBN: 978-0-387-89021-0.

In this introductory chapter, we describe the key lessons from an earlier HCI Educators’ conference, held in Limerick in 2006, the outcomes of which led to the theme of HCIEd 2007 – Creativity: Experiencing to Educate and Design. The paper discusses the lessons leant around four key questions: nature vs. nurture: can creative invention be taught; what tools and methods are there to help students learn to develop creative solutions; how do we train educators in creative invention; and what are the stumbling blocks to ‘inventivity’?  Another version of the paper is available here.

 

Kotzé, P; Purgathofer  P. 2009. Designing Design Exercises – From Theory to Creativity and Real-world Use. In: Kotzé  P;  Wong W;  Jorge J, Dix, A;  and Silva P A (Eds), Creativity and HCI: From Experience to Design in Education. Springer, 42 – 59,  ISBN: 978-0-387-89021-0.

This paper discusses a framework for design exercises for interaction design and HCI based on two theoretical frameworks and a set of knowledge transformers. The model scope design exercises on a continuum ranging from creativity to real-world use based on the argument that students must experience design to enable them to learn effectively. Another version of the paper is available here.

 

Edited Books

Kotzé  P;  Wong W;  Jorge J, Dix, A;  and Silva P A . 2009. Creativity and HCI: From Experience to Design in Education. In: Kotzé  P;  Wong W;  Jorge J, Dix, A;  and Silva P A (Eds), Creativity and HCI: From Experience to Design in Education. Springer, 1 – 11, ISBN: 978-0-387-89021-0.

 

Tom Gross, Jan Gulliksen, Paula Kotzé, Lars Oestreicher, Philippe Palanque, Raquel Oliveira Prates, and Marco Winckler (Eds.). 2009. Human-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2009: 12th IFIP TC 13 International Conference, Uppsala, Sweden, August 24-28, 2009, Proceedings, Part I; Springer LNCS 5726.

 

Tom Gross, Jan Gulliksen, Paula Kotzé, Lars Oestreicher, Philippe Palanque, Raquel Oliveira Prates, and Marco Winckler (Eds.). 2009. Human-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2009: 12th IFIP TC 13 International Conference, Uppsala, Sweden, August 24-28, 2009, Proceedings, Part II; Springer LNCS 5727.

 

 

Theses

 

PhD Thesis

Darelle van Greunen. 2009. A Framework for the User Interface Design of Business Process Management Tools. PhD in Computer Science, University of South Africa.

Supervisor: Paula Kotzé

Co-supervisor: Alta van der Merwe

Abstract:

Business process management (BPM) tools are a complex category of enterprise software which offers many layers of functionality in producing effective and optimised business processes. One of the most important components of successful BPM, however, is the group of users. This refers to those people who interact with the workflows at various points in order to enable a certain task or objective to be completed. Good user interface design has considerable benefits. When user interface (UI) design complements the way users think and learn, accommodates their physical needs, and meets their expectations for comfort and convenience, the interaction of human and machine becomes more productive. This study focused on the UI design of BPM tools with a specific emphasis on the user experience (UX) when using the tool to complete the tasks in support of business processes. The study was divided into three research subquestions: the first focused on the identification of factors that have an impact on the UX of BPM tools; the second on the impact of critical UX factors on BPM user tasks and the third on the impact of critical UX factors on the UI design of BPM tools to support business processes. In order to answer the first research subquestion, factors were identified, and focus groups and questionnaires were used for data collection. Issues had to be indentified for discussion in the focus groups, and these were derived from the literature and confirmed by industry participants. For the second research subquestion, which focused on the impact of critical UX factors on user tasks, user observations and personal interviews were conducted in two centres in South Africa. Finally, to answer the third research subquestion on the impact of critical UX factors on UI design for BPM tools, data triangulation was used to derive a framework for such design. The framework developed was used to redesign and evaluate prototype BPM tool interfaces.

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